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Carmel-by-the-Sea In One Day – Do it All – Beach, Wine, Shopping, History, Doggies

Carmel-by-the-Sea
In One Day

Actually it is impossible to see all there is to see in our 1 mile square village by the sea, but if that is all you have.  Here are a few ideas. 

Ocean Avenue 

Take this walking tour of our business district, grab a cup of coffee from one of our great coffee houses and enjoy the quaint village we call Carmel-by-the-Sea. 

Carmel Beach 

Add on this walking tour mid way to the Ocean Avenue tour and visit one of the most beautiful white sand beaches in the world, Carmel Beach.  Note on the NW Corner of Camino Real and Ocean a Craftsman style home built in 1913.  This was the home of our first mayor Alfred P. Fraser.  He served our village from it’s inception in 1916 to 1920.  

Breakfast (or Lunch) 

Hungry?  We have many restaurants serving breakfast and lunch. Some are happy to feed your doggie friends.  

Fairy Tale Architecture 

Hugh W. Comstock, the Builder of Dreams, arrived in town, fell in love, and built his first house in 1924.  The majority of his fairy tale house are located in the Historical Hill District.  A bit of a hike but worth it. 

Wine 

Still time in your day.  We have more wine bars per square mile than – well probably any place on the planet.  Each one is a destination on its own.  

I hope that keeps you busy enough – Really there is so much to do.  I haven’t even touched the hiking, birding, and biking.  


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Self Guided – Carmel Wine Walk by-the-Sea – Figge Cellars, Caraccioli Cellars and Galante Vineyards

The following wine rooms on the Carmel Wine Walk by-the-Sea Passport are all located on Dolores between Ocean Avenue and Seventh Avenue.  They are listed as #10, #11, and #12 on the street map. This map is also shown at the end of this post.


(#10) Figge Cellars 
Inside Winfield Gallery 

Dolores between Ocean Ave. and 7th Avenue 

Hours Thurs – Monday 12pm – 6pm
831/244-4149 



Peter Figge opened Figge Cellars in 2004.  He is the grape grower, the chief winemaker, and bottler.  Peter handpicks his grapes from local vineyards, Pelio in Carmel Valley, Parasio and La Reina in Santa Lucia Highlands, and Sycamore Flat in Arroyo Seco.


With subtle flavors, each bottle of Figge wine gives off a distinctive sense of the place, specific to their terroir, where the grapes were grown. 

Figge handcrafts two Chardonnays, two Pinot Noirs, and one Syrah. Each season produces about 1,800 cases.  


In a celebration of art and wine, Figge is located inside Winfield Art Gallery so that you can enjoy your wine while strolling through the gallery.  Taste a flight of three 2 ounce pours for $9 or a flight of 5 for $12.

(#11) Caraccioli Cellars 
Dolores between Ocean Avenue and 7th
Open Monday – Thursday 2pm – 7pm
Friday and Saturday 11am – 10pm
Sunday 11am – 7pm
831-622-7722


Salinas Valley native, Gary Caraccioli launched Caraccioli Cellars in 2006 after convincing his uncle and brother to go into the wine making business with the goal of making an exclusive and original wine to the Santa Lucia Highlands.  This turned out to be a sparkling wine.  

The Caraccioli family teamed up with Joe Rawitzer  and Michel Salgues.  Joe is said to have began wine making at the age of four, but did receive a degree in biochemistry and studied wine making and enology at UC Davis Extension before pursing wine making as his career.  Michel Salgues, who is the head winemaker at Caraccioli was born in France and reputedly the finest sparkling wine maker in California.


The Caraccioli family is serious about their sparkling wine, which undergoes a labor-intensive secondary fermentation, called méthod champenoise to create all the bubbles in their Brut Cuvée.  They also not only abide by the French law on Champagne but exceed it. French law requires Champagne Houses in France use only the first 150 gallons of juice extracted from each ton of grapes.  Caraccioli Cellars uses only the first 120 gallons providing the best ‘heart’ juice from each grape. 

The Caraccioli Cellars tasting room is located on the north side of Dolores between Ocean and Seventh.  The tasting room features a long Perota bar slab which offers plenty of space to sample a flight of wine.  Besides their sparkling wine, Caraccioli also offers a Pinor Noir and Chardonnay made from grapes from their Santa Lucia Highlands vineyard. 


A Caraccioli Full Flight, taste of any of their six wines is $15.  Pair this with a small plate of Caraccioli’s cheese and charcuterie , Mediterranean olives or home made Bruschetta for $4 to $10.  Or after dinner pair the 91 Point Caraccioli Cellars 2006 Brut Rosé Santa Lucia Highlands and Moonstruck Chocolate Truffles. 


(#12) Galante Vineyards 
Dolores Avenue between Ocean and Seventh
Sunday – Friday 1pm to 6pm
Saturday 12 pm to 6pm
831/624-3800

Galante Vineyards has the pleasure of being the first tasting room in Carmel-by-the-Sea, having opened in 2004.  Galante tasting room is located in one of Carmel’s quaint courtyards.


It can be reached by one of our secret passageways via Der Ling Lane located under the arch doorway on the south side of Ocean Avenue between Dolores and Lincoln. How Der Ling Lane received this name is another story and part of my self-guided walk and history of Ocean Avenue.


Or when strolling down the west side of Dolores between Ocean and Seventh Avenue you might come across Cowboy Galante he will point you in the right direction of the tasting room behind Piccadilly Park.  


The Galante Family history goes way back, back to 1902 when James Frank Devendorf and Frank Powers filed a new subdivision map that would eventually become the core of the village of Carmel.  Jack Galante, the owner of Galante Vineyards is the great grandson of the Father of Carmel, Frank Devendorf. 


In 1969, Jack’s parents purchased a 700 acre cattle ranch in Carmel Valley.  While ranching they began growing grapes on their property.


In 1994, Jack built a winery to produce their 100% estate wines.  Today Galante Vineyards is known for their premier Cabernet Sauvignon.  Their tasting room has a rustic western theme.  Check out the overstuffed cowboy boot chair or rocking chair built out of wine barrels. 


Besides Cab, Galante is known for its Malbec, Petite Sirah, Merlot and Pinot’s, stop in and enjoy a flight. 


Info on Carmel Wine Walk by-the-Sea Passport 
Part One De Tierra Vineyards, Wrath Tasting Room, & Scheid Tasting Room 
Part Two Manzoni Cellars, Blair Estate, & Shale Canyon Tasting Room 
Part Three  Dawn’s Dream, Silvestri Vineyards, VIno Napoli

//www.zeemaps.com/pub?group=855033&legend=1&list=1

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Self Guided – Carmel Wine Walk by-the-Sea – Wine Tasting Passport

Carmel Wine Walk by-the-Sea


Carmel-by-the-Sea is home to 18 (at last count) wine tasting rooms.  Twelve of these are part of the Carmel Wine Walk by-the-Sea Passport, available for purchase on line or at the Visitor’s Center on San Carlos between Fifth and Sixth Avenue.



The current cost of the Passport is $65 which entitles the buyer to one $10 flight of wine at nine of the twelve wine rooms listed on the passport. A flight of wine being three, four or even six pours of about two ounces depending on the wine room.

Now I love wine but thankfully the Passport does not have to be used all in one day.  It can be used over a weekend, a month, or even several months.


Another good reason to purchase the Passport is that a bottle of wine purchased at participating wine rooms may be taken to selected restaurants and the corkage fee is waved! There are rules for this, so please make sure you inquire at the wine room of your choice how to enjoy their bottle of wine at your dinner.  

Currently corkage fees for one bottle of wine per visit per party will be waved at Allegro Gourmet PizzeriaAndre’s BoucheeBasil’s CarmelBig Sur LodgeBig Sur River InnCantinetta LucaCarmel BelleLe St. TropezLittle NapoliRio GrilleVesuvio, and Village Corner

The wine must be purchased while using the Wine Passport at Blair EstateCaraccioli CellarsDawn’s DreamDe Tierra VineyardsFigge CellarsGalante VineyardsManzoni CellarsShale CanyonScheid VIneyards, Silvestri VineyardsVino Napoli and Wrath

In the following four posts I have put together a self guided walking tour of the wine rooms on the passport which can be used with this street map. On the map tasting rooms with a red marker are on the Carmel Wine Walk Passport. Blue marker denote tasting rooms not on the Carmel Wine Walk Passport. 

Please note that flight prices and hours of operation are subject to change as are the restaurants waving corkage fees. 

So in no particular order enjoy the
 Carmel Wine Walk by-the-Sea 
 Salute!

Part One  De Tierra Vineyard, Wrath, & Scheid

Part Two Manzoni Cellars, Blair Estate & Shale Canyon

Part Three Dawn’s Dream, Silvestri, & Vino Napoli

Part Four Figge Cellars, Caraccioli Cellars, & Galante

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Wine Tasting Carmel-by-the-Sea – Self Guided Walking Tour

Looking for a place to vacation where you can eat, drink and sleep without ever having to get in your car? Ok it does require some walking, but that is how you earn your food and drink, right? 

Welcome to Carmel-by-the-Sea.  A relatively small village as towns go that encompasses one square mile on your Google map. It is home to approximately 4,000 residents, 45 hotels, 50 art galleries, 37 restaurants, and 18+ (at last count) wine tasting rooms. 

This post will concentrate on our wine tasting rooms which seem to be popping up as quickly as mushrooms in a forest after a good downpour.

A map of these tasting rooms that you may pull up on your electronic device is available here and at the end of this post.  


Carmel Wine Walk Passport 


So how does one visit all the existing tasting rooms? There are two ways to go about sampling the wares of our wine rooms. If you are in town for just a short time, pick any one of the following tasting rooms and enjoy.  If you are a local or come into town often, the best deal is  to purchase a Carmel Wine Walk Passport from the Visitor’s Center on San Carlos between 5th and 6th.  The current cost of the Passport is $65 which entitles the buyer to one $10 flight of wine at nine of the twelve wine rooms listed on the passport. A flight of wine being three, four or even six pours of about two ounces depending on the wine room.


Now I love wine but thankfully the Passport does not have to be used all in one day.  It can be used over a weekend, a month, or even several months.


Another good reason to purchase the Passport is that a bottle of wine purchased at participating wine rooms may be taken to selected restaurants and the corkage fee is waved! There are rules for this, so please make sure you inquire at the wine room of your choice how to enjoy their bottle of wine at your dinner.  

Currently corkage fees for one bottle of wine per visit per party will be waved at Allegro Gourmet Pizzeria, Andre’s Bouchee, Basil’s Carmel, Big Sur Lodge, Big Sur River Inn, Cantinetta Luca, Carmel Belle, Le St. Tropez, Little Napoli, Rio Grille, Vesuvio, and Village Corner.  The wine must be purchased while using the Wine Passport at Blair Estate, Caraccioli Cellars, Dawn’s Dream, De Tierra Vineyards, Figge Cellars, Galante Vineyards, Manzoni Cellars, Shale Canyon, Scheid VIneyards, Silvestri Vineyards, Vino Napoli and Wrath

The following is a self guided walking tour of our current wine tasting rooms. It is meant to be used along with this street map. Those on the Carmel Wine Walk Passport have a (P) next to their name. On the map tasting rooms with a red marker are on the Carmel Wine Walk Passport. Blue marker denote tasting rooms not on the Carmel Wine Walk Passport. 

Please note that flight prices and hours of operation are subject to change as are the restaurants waving corkage fees. 

So in no particular order enjoy the Carmel-by-the-Sea wine tasting venues.  Salute! 

De Tierra Vineyard (P)

Mission between 5th and 6th
Open Tuesday – Thursday 2pm-7pm
Friday – Sunday 12pm – 8pm

831/622-9704



In the mid 1990’s Tom and Carol Russell began looking for the perfect property to build an artisan winery as well as a home.  They found this in a 20-acre plot of land in Corral de Tierra on the Monterey Peninsula midway between the Santa Lucia Highlands and Carmel Valley.  


With the climate in Corral de Tierra perfect for growing grapes and the volume of wine that could be produced on their land enough to support a small winery, De Tierra Vineyards was born.


Owner, winemaker and vintner, Tom Russell uses sustainable practices (SIP) to grow four 100% organic varietals on the Russell Estate Vineyard which is also entirely run on solar energy.  

The vineyard is SIP Certified. SIP stands for Sustainability in Practice, a unique certification that goes beyond just being “green.” A  SIP Certified vineyard, farms in a way that protects both natural and human resources. 

Dog friendly De Tierra tasting room is located on the north side of Ocean Avenue on the ground floor of a brick and stucco building.  $10 for a flight of four pours and $15 for a flight of six.

Wrath Tasting Room (P)
First Floor Carmel Plaza 
Ocean and Junipero
Hours Monday – Saturday 10am to 6pm
Sunday 11am to 5pm
831/620-1909



Located on the ground floor of the Carmel Plaza (Ocean and Junipero) just across from the Fountain and Woof is 


Wrath Tasting RoomWrath Co-owner, Michael Thomas came to wine-making by way of the world of academia. With a PhD in Classical Art and Archaeology, Michael spent fifteen years excavating sights and living in Italy.  It was during that time he also developed his passion for wine.



In 2007, the Thomas family purchased San Saba Vineyards, in the Santa Lucia Highlands and “set out to dramatically change the estate’s wine and viticulture.”   They worked with Steve McIntyre to become SIP Certified, developing a sustainable program specific to their vineyards unique conditions.     


The Thomas family believes that sustainable growing will enable them to produce wines that are more authentic and specific to the terroir ( French for land) of their vineyards in the Santa Lucia Highlands.  Early indications suggest they are right, as Wrath’s first two vintages have received over twenty 90-point scores.


Now in their seventh year of production Wrath produces site specific Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Syrah, and Sauvignon Blanc from their sustainable estate vineyard and other properties in the Santa Lucia Highlands. 

The tasting room is also available for private events of up to 100 people or a custom tasting experience can be designed for couples or small groups. 

Purchase a bottle of Wrath wine then go next door to The Cheese Shop for food fixings before taking a self-guided walking tour down Ocean Avenue to Carmel Beach to watch the waves while enjoying your picnic.

Scheid Tasting Room (P)
San Carlos and 7th
Open Daily from 12pm to 6pm
831/ 656 – 9463



It is said, a great wine begins in the vineyard.  Al Scheid knew this to be true, which is why in 1971 he purchased acreage in Monterey County based on the advice of Professor A. J. Winkler of the University of California at Davis.  Winkler, a professor of Viticulture and Enology (the cultivation of grapes and science of wine making) determined Monterey County comparable to Napa, Sonoma, Burgundy and Bordeaux.

Scheid also believed that in order to grow the highest quality wine grapes one had to adhere to the three E’s of sustainability; environmentally sound practices, social Equity, and Economic viability.  Scheid, another SIP Certified vineyard, now has ten estate vineyards (over 5,000 acres) located along a 70-mile spread of the Salinas Valley where they grow their 38 different varietals.


Why the screwtops?  After doing their homework, Scheid reached two important conclusions: First screw cap closures were never negative in terms of wine quality and were often positive and second, no matter what efforts were undertaken, TCA (2,4,6-trichloranisole) would probably infect a certain percentage of cork closure wines forever.  

The decision to use screwcaps wasn’t that they are cheaper to buy, or easier to produce, or even prettier.  The “Knights of the Schied Table” took an oath of honor in 2009 and pledged to go 100% screwcap, why? Because the Knights determined that they were “just better.  And at the end of the day, isn’t that what matters most?” 

Scheid tasting room is located one block south of Ocean Avenue at the entrance to Bell Tower Court at San Carlos and 7th.



Currently, they offer three different wine tasting flights: the Estate Flight $10 per person, waved with purchase of 2 bottles, Reserve Pinot Noir Flight $20 per person, waved with a purchase of 4 bottles, Reserve Mixed Flight $20 per person, waved with purchase of 4 bottles.


Voted Best Tasting Room by the Carmel Pine Cone in 2013, Scheid tasting room in Carmel can also be reserved for different venues.  They can accommodate a maximum of 40 guests for a reception style gathering, 30 guests for a sit-down dinner, or 26 guests in a classroom setting. 


Manzoni Cellars (P)
Paseo Courtyard
San Carlos between Ocean and 7th
Open Sunday – Friday 11am to 6pm
Saturday 11am to 7pm
831/620-6541 

The Manzoni family has lived and farmed in the Santa Lucia Highlands since the 1930’s.  Initially in the dairy business which evolved to crop farming and finally into wine making when the family converted six acres of land into vine rootstock in the 1990’s.   
 

Manzoni Vineyards‘ small estate vineyard, produces just 2000 cases of wine a year. With their wines continually scoring 90+ points it is clear that they strive for quality not quantity.


Manzoni Cellars Pinot Noir won a gold medal at the San Francisco Chronicle Wine Competition and their Syrah double gold at the San Diego International Wine Competition. 


Their boutique wine room complete with massive antique bar is located in The Paseo Courtyard on San Carlos between Ocean and 7th, across from Basil Carmel


Manzoni Vineyards specializes in Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Pinot Gris and Syrah.  Stop by their wine room and your host will most likely be managing partner Mark Manzoni himself (shown below pouring his vintage at the Coachman’s Inn during the Carmel Heritage Society’s Carmel Inns of Distinction 2013).   Your dog is also welcome to join you at the Manzoni wine bar.


   Blair Estate and Shale Canyon Wines (P)
The Paseo Courtyard
San Carlos between Ocean and 7th

Hours Daily 11am to 7pm

831/625-WINE  

Blair Estate and Shale Canyon share a wine room at the back of The Paseo Courtyard on San Carlos behind Manzoni and across from Basil.  

In 2007 Jeffrey Blair planted the first Pinot Noir grapes on his beloved grandmother Delfina’s property in the Arroyo Seco Appellations.


Their debut release produced 258 cases of Blair Estate 2010 Pinot Noir Delfina’s Vineyard.  In the glass this inaugural Pinot Noir displays a hint of rose petal, anise, and spice combined with Bing cherry and strawberry. 


With the success of such a fine Pinot from the Arroyo Seco Appellations, Blair Estate decided to expand their varietals.  In 2012 they purchased fruit from two neighboring vineyards, Meador Estate and Roger Rose.


In 2013 they released their Blair Estate 2012 Pinot Gris Meador Vineyard which received 90 Points and “Editors’ Choice” from Wine Enthusiast Magazine and 


Blair Estate 2012 Chardonnay Roger Rose Vineyard which received 90 Points and a Gold Medal at the San Francisco Chronicle Wine Competition.  

Sixth-generation Salinas Valley brothers, Jake, Keith and Tim Prader, planted Shale Canyon vineyard with a number of red varietals in 2008.  The vineyard is on such isolated property in the upper portion of the Arroyo Seco Canyon, that production is run totally off the grid with a propane stove and well pump powered by a photovoltaic cell system (solar).   

Shale Canyon specializes in small lots of hand crafted varietals of Chardonnay, Syrah, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Petite Sirah, Malbec, Mourvedre, and Zinfandel. 

Shale Canyon supplements their wine production with grapes purchased from a number of areas. Chardonnay, syrah and merlot come from vineyards in the Arroyo Seco, zinfandel from Dry Creek in Healdsburg and cabernet from San Benito County. 


A stop by the joint wine room of Blair Estate and Shale Canyon will probably find proprietors Tim Prader or Jeffrey Blair pouring varietals (Tim and Jeffrey shown below at the Carmel-by-the-Glass 2013 presented by Rich Pèpe of Vino Napoli in Devendorf Park).    

Dawn’s Dream (P)
NW Corner 7th and San Carlos
Open daily 1pm to 6pm
Saturday 12pm to 6pm(831) 659-2649


Dawn Galante, wife of Galante Vineyard‘s Jack Galante, opened Dawn’sDream Tasting Room in February 2014.  



 You will find Dawn’s Dream behind Thinker Toys in the Plaza San Carlos NW Corner of 7th and San Carlos. 


White’s poured are a Chardonnay and Savignon Blanc.  Also try the “Trilogy of Sisters,” three Pinot’s named after Dawn’s daughters: Pinot Alyssa which has hints of persimmons and vanilla, Pinot Nicole, with hints of brown sugar and gooseberries, and Pinot Rachael with hints of maple, cedar and tea roses. 


A $10 flight of wine consists of seven 2 ounce pours. Even your pets are welcome, so come on by. 

 


Silvestri Vineyards Tasting Room (P)
7th Avenue between Dolores and San Carlos 
 Open Daily 12pm to 7pm
831/625-0111
In 1989, after a successful career as a music composer, writing over 100 scores for film, Alan Silvestri moved his family of five from Los Angeles to the Carmel Valley.


In the spring of 2000 Alan and his wife Sandra began a new adventure.  They planted three varieties of grapes on their ten plus acres in Carmel Valley.  Their first harvest of 100% estate grown grapes of the Silvestri Vineyards was in the Fall of 2003.   
Silvestri Vineyards Wine Room, decorated with movie posters for which Alan wrote the score, is located on 7 Avenue between Dolores and San Carlos.


As passionate about his wine as he is about his music Alan says, “There’s something about the elemental side of wine making that appeals to me. Both music making and wine making involve the blending of art and science.  Just as each note brings its own voice to the melody, each vine brings its own unique personality to the wine.” 

Visit Silvestri Tasting Room and enjoy some of their current vintages which include: a 2012 Pinot Gris with hints of pear, kiwi and lemon lime, 2012 Pinot Blanc with hints of honeysuckle and cantaloupe, 2010 Chardonnay “Bella Sandra” with hints of honey, green apple and vanilla, and 2009 Pinot Noir “Rising Tide” with hints of blackberry and plum.


Vino Napoli (P)
NE Corner of Dolores and 7th
Daily 3pm to 10pm
831/626-2032 
Vino Napoli is the largest tasting room in town is over 3,000 square feet with two flat screen TV’s , and a half dozen café style tables set on top of wine barrels warmed by a fireplace.   


Vino Napoli is not only a tasting room, but it is also a wine bar.  Meaning besides enjoying a tasting flight, you may purchase a regular 6 ounce pour glass of wine and stay awhile. 


There is also a selection
 of light appetizers offered. 



The wines featured at Vino Napoli are selected from partners and close friends of the Pèpe family.



 In 2001 the Pèpe family offered their first vintage and today they are proud to offer a selection of four different wines from current vintages.  Try Pèpe Vesuvio a blend of Cabernet, Merlot and Syrah or Pèpe 100% Chardonnay. Must be over 21 to enter. 


Figge Cellars (P)
Inside Winfield Gallery 

Dolores between Ocean Ave. and 7th Avenue 

Hours Thurs – Monday 12pm – 6pm

831-224-4149 



Peter Figge opened Figge Cellars in 2004.  He is the grape grower, the chief winemaker, and bottler.  Peter handpicks his grapes from local vineyards, Pelio in Carmel Valley, Parasio and La Reina in Santa Lucia Highlands, and Sycamore Flat in Arroyo Seco. 


With subtle flavors, each bottle of Figge wine gives off a distinctive sense of the place where the grapes were grown. 

Figge handcrafts two Chardonnays, two Pinot Noirs, and one Syrah. Each season produces about 1,800 cases.  

In a celebration of art and wine, Figge is located inside Winfield Art Gallery so that you can enjoy your wine while strolling through the gallery.  Taste a flight of three 2 ounce pours for $9 or a flight of 5 for $12.
Caraccioli Cellars (P)
Dolores between Ocean Avenue and 7th

Open Monday – Thursday 2pm – 7pm

Friday and Saturday 11am – 10pm

Sunday 11am – 7pm
831-622-7722



Salinas Valley native, Gary Caraccioli launched Caraccioli Cellars in 2006 after convincing his uncle and brother to go into the wine making business with the goal of making an exclusive and original wine to the Santa Lucia Highlands.  This turned out to be a sparkling wine.  


The Caraccioli family teamed up with Joe Rawitzer  and Michel Salgues.  Joe is said to have began wine making at the age of four, but did receive a degree in biochemistry and studied wine making and enology at UC Davis Extension before pursing wine making as his career.  Michel Salgues, who is the head winemaker at Caraccioli was born in France and reputedly the finest sparkling wine maker in California.


The Caraccioli family is serious about their sparkling wine, which undergoes a labor-intensive secondary fermentation, called méthod champenoise to create all the bubbles in their Brut Cuvée.  They also not only abide by the French law on Champagne but exceed it. French law requires Champagne Houses in France use only the first 150 gallons of juice extracted from each ton of grapes.  Caraccioli Cellars uses only the first 120 gallons providing the best ‘heart’ juice from each grape. 


The Caraccioli Cellars tasting room is located on the north side of Dolores between Ocean and Seventh.  The tasting room features a long Perota bar slab which offers plenty of space to sample a flight of wine.  Besides their sparkling wine, Caraccioli also offers a Pinor Noir and Chardonnay made from grapes from their Santa Lucia Highlands vineyard.  


A Caraccioli Full Flight, taste of any of their six wines is $15.  Pair this with a small plate of Caraccioli’s cheese and charcuterie , Mediterranean olives or home made Bruschetta for $4 to $10.  Or after dinner pair the 91 Point Caraccioli Cellars 2006 Brut Rosé Santa Lucia Highlands and Moonstruck Chocolate Truffles. 

   Galante Vineyards (P)Dolores Avenue between Ocean and 7th
 
Sunday – Friday 1pm to 6pm
 
Saturday 12pm to 6pm 831/624-3800 


Galante Vineyards has the pleasure of being the first tasting room in Carmel-by-the-Sea, having opened in 2004.  Galante tasting room is located in one of Carmel’s quaint courtyards.


 

It can be reached by one of our secret passageways via Der Ling Lane located under the arch doorway on the south side of Ocean Avenue between Dolores and Lincoln. How Der Ling Lane received this name is another story and part of my self-guided walk and history of Ocean Avenue.

Or when strolling down the west side of Dolores between Ocean and 7th you might come across Cowboy Galante he will point you in the right direction of the tasting room behind Piccadilly Park.  
The Galante Family history goes way back, back to 1902 when James Frank Devendorf and Frank Powers filed a new subdivision map that would eventually become the core of the village of Carmel.  Jack Galante, the owner of Galante Vineyards is the great grandson of the Father of Carmel, Frank Devendorf. 

In 1969, Jack’s parents purchased a 700 acre cattle ranch in Carmel Valley.  While ranching they began growing grapes on their property.

In 1994, Jack built a winery to produce their 100% estate wines.  Today Galante Vineyards is known for their premier Cabernet Sauvignon.  Their tasting room has a rustic western theme.  Check out the overstuffed cowboy boot chair or rocking chair built out of wine barrels. 

Besides Cab, Galante is known for its Malbec, Petite Sirah, Merlot and Pinot’s, stop in and enjoy a flight. 


Now if these wine tasting rooms are not enough choices for you, we have more.  The following tasting rooms are not on the Carmel Wine Walk Passport but they also deserve mention.  They are denoted on the Wine Tasting Map with a blue marker. 


Surf N’ Sand 
NW Corner of 6th and Torres 

831/624-1805 


Surf N’ Sand located next to its “sister” store Bruno’s Market and Deli, is known for its extensive selection of wine from Monterey County as well as for its impressive list  of over 100 microbrew and handcrafted beers.  


Surf N’ Sand hosts wine tastings by appointment for individuals and small groups. Call 831/624-1805 to set up a private tasting.   

Wyland Gallery and Wine
Bringing Art and Wine Together
Ocean Avenue between 
Mission and San Carlos


Wyland Galleries has had a Carmel presence since 1978.  Wyland is a  multi-faceted artist specializing in marine life paintings, sculpture and photography.  Called a “Marine Michelangelo” by USA Today, Wyland’s brilliantly colorful paintings of marine life are sought by collectors from around the world.  


In 2005 Wyland partnered with winemaker Marlowe Joseph Huber to create the Wyland Cellars label. Huber used grapes sourced from Napa and Sonoma Valley to create this brand, and bottles were embellished with Wyland’s marine life artwork.  


A portion of all the Wyland Cellars wine products go directly to the Wyland Foundation supporting clean waters, clean rivers, the environment and the protection of sea life.  

Stop in and sample one of the Wyland Cellars eight premium wines.  A $12.50 flight consists of five 2 ounce pours.  


Tudor Wines 
Tasting Room inside Andre’s Bouchée Bistro
Mission between Ocean and Seventh Avenue
Open from 4:30pm

 831/626-7880

Tudor Wines is a family-owned vineyard that had its inaugural release from their Santa Lucia Highlands vineyard in 2000.  Their wines which have received 90+ from Wine Spectator Magazine are available for tasting at the tasting room inside Andre’sBouchée Bistro on Mission between Ocean and Seventh.  

Albatross Ridge 
Court of the Fountains 

Mission Street between Ocean and Seventh
Open 12pm to 6pm

831/402-8992

In the 1930’s William Hawley Bowlus began launching his one of a kind “Albatross” sailplanes off the ridges of Carmel Valley.  Today Williams’ grandson, Garrett Bowlus, grows Pinot Noir and Chardonnay grapes on the same steep Carmel Valley ridges.  Albatross Ridge Wines are available for tasting in their tasting room located in the Court of the Fountains on Mission. Open Thursday through Sunday from 12pm to 6pm. 


Otter Cove Wines
San Carlos between Seventh and Eighth
Inside Tree House Restaurant
Tasting Room open from 3:00pm
831/320-3050

Owner and winemaker Richard Oh of Otter Cove Wines pours Riesling, Chardonnay, Syrah, Pinot Noir, and dry Gewϋrztraminer varietals from vineyards in either the Santa Lucia Highlands or Monterey at the Tree House Cafe Wine Room from 3PM daily.  


RF Wines/Puma Road 
Dolores between Ocean and Seventh
In the Tuck Box Patio
Open 2:30pm to 7pm
831/622-7000


Ray Franscioni is a third generation Monterey County farmer.  He produces three releases under the RF Wines label, Puma Road, Pedregal, and Lilia.  Puma Road wines are available for tasting at their tasting room in the Tuck Box Kiosk built by “fairy tale style” builder Hugh Comstock in 1931.  

Trió Carmel 
Dolores between Ocean and Seventh
831/250-7714


Trió Carmel is a place where local artisan wines, premium olive oils and balsamic vinegar’s come together with abstract art.  It is truly a unique experience.  


Sample fresh olive oils,
balsamic and flavored vinegar. 



Then have your picks packaged
 into bottles to take home. 

At the same time taste some exceptional Monterey County wines from Pelerin, Le P’tit Paysan, La Marea, Fieldfare, & Mesa Del Sol while enjoying the contemporary art of local artists.
Southern Latitudes Wine Cellars 
Lincoln between Ocean Avenue and Sixth Avenue
Open Wednesday through Sunday 11am to 6pm
Closed Monday and Tuesday
831/622-7652


Southern Latitudes specializes exclusively in the wines of Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, South Africa and Chile.  They offer a flight of five or six 2 ounce pours for $11 to $15.  Stop by and meet the owners beagles, Taz and Flinders!

If the 18 tasting rooms mentioned above are not enough, The Cheese Shop in Carmel Plaza and Nielson Brothers Market on the NE corner of San Carlos and Seventh also have wine tasting, and Paraiso Vineyards has applied for their licence to open a wine room behind the Cottage of Sweets in the Court of the Golden Bough.  

So come and stay in one of our quaint hotels, eat in one of our unique restaurants and spend a weekend wine tasting without ever having to get in your car until you are ready to go home. Salute!


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Pictures and video – L. A. Momboisse http://www.carmelbytheseaca.blogspot.com 

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Carmel-by-the-Sea Walk Ocean Avenue to the Beach Tour and Map

One Hour Walking Tour from Tour Bus Stop
Down Ocean Avenue to the Beach and Back 
(with no stops or lollygagging 40 minutes) 
Welcome to Carmel-by-the-Sea! Tour buses roll down Ocean Avenue and (1) park at the corner of Junipero and Ocean, behind the (2) Carmel Plaza.  Numbers refer to the zeemap at the end of this post or open in a separate window here
Bus drivers give their fare one hour (sometimes more, sometimes less) to tour town on their own.  The purpose of these walking tours is to offer some direction for a short time well spent in our quaint town. 
From Carmel Plaza it is 10 blocks to the beach.  The last five blocks (from Monte Verde) down and back are moderately steep. There are benches along the way for resting, but remember it takes about 40 minutes to walk down and back at a medium pace without stopping.

Here is a sneak peak at the Carmel Beach
 at the foot of Ocean Avenue.
Of course I can not guarantee the
weather, but even in the fog
the white sands are beautiful. 
Begin by crossing Ocean Avenue and heading down the north side of Ocean toward the beach. For more information on the shops between Mission Street and Monte Verde see the Window Shopping Ocean Avenue Tour.
To your right is (3) Devendorf Park named after the Father of Carmel, Frank Devendof. There is a public restroom at the northeast corner of the park, and at the southwest corner the largest specimen of the Coastal Live Oak in the village. Cross Mission and stop by (4) Cafe Carmel for coffee or snack to carry with you on your walk.  
Three more blocks and you will pass the (5) Pine Inn Carmel’s oldest hotel, built in 1889 by city founders Frank Devendorf and Frank Powers.   
It is worth a peak inside, 
so make a quick detour and 
walk up the red carpeted stairway

 to the lobby and back out.
At the corner, cross Monte Verde pass the
(6) Lobos Lodge which runs the entire block.

After Lobos Lodge cross Casanova and you will be entering the residential area and last four block decent to the beach.  If you find it difficult walking down hill, remember you will be walking up the same blocks in about 20 minutes.  If you think it is too strenuous cross Ocean Avenue at any point and make your way back toward the bus stop on the south side of Ocean Avenue. Or if part of your group wants to go further, and you don’t, cross Ocean Avenue and make yourself comfortable on one of the benches and wait for your party to return to you.  
The landscape changes dramatically after crossing Casanova.  Much of your walk now will be covered by meandering tree limbs, which have the right-of-way so watch where you walk.

Behind the orange heart and 

and green moon gate 
on the northwest corner of Casanova and Ocean are two historical cottages built in 1925 for (7) Charles and Eleanor Halstead Yates by master-builder Michael J. Murphy.  It is estimated that Murphy built 80% of the homes in the village by the 1930’s.  Behind a bougainvillea and ivy covered fence,

  the two cottages share a front yard.  

 Murphy built them in a “T” style and 
they remain largely original.  

From the Yates Cottages to the end of the block watch out for  the low growing limbs of the Coastal Live Oak

Cross Camino Real.  At the northwest corner behind a fence covered with shrubbery sits another historical home, the (8) Alfred P. Fraser House a wood framed Craftsman style house built in 1913.   

The house is built on three lots and does not become visible until midway down the block behind the grape stake fence.

Alfred P. Fraser was Carmel’s first mayor, elected at the town’s inception in 1916; he served until 1920 during the formative period of the Carmel city government.  Fraser also served as Carmel’s police court judge and superintendent of streets. 

Interspersed amongst the smooth light color trunks of the Coastal Live Oak are the dark deeply-grooved trucks of the Monterey Pine. This tree grows tall and straight with few lower branches.

Rare in the wild, the Monterey Pine occurs naturally in three areas along the California coast, one is here on the Monterey  Peninsula. You will see quite a few on this walk. Leaves (needles) are in threes.

At the northwest corner of San Antonio and Ocean is that largest tree in the village, a (9) Blue Gum Eucalyptus.

At the gateway to Carmel Beach, the Carmel-by-the-Sea Garden Club began a dunes restoration project in 2009 to return the dunes to their natural state.

The goal of the restoration project, conducted under the supervision of a dunes restoration biologist, is to eliminate the invasive non-native plants such as those in the Ice Plant Family,

 and recreate a self-sustaining natural dunes ecosystem with thriving populations of native species, such as the Pink Sand Verbena.

This will take some time and there will be a transition period.  Depending on the time of year you happen upon our dune restoration area you might see Dune Sagewort

 in various degrees of growth.  Small silvery gray mounds send out a spike of yellow flowers that dry out and die off.

Among the Sagewort, Narrow-leaved Ice Plant (non-native and very invasive) poke through the sand.

If left the Ice Plant will take over

and choke out the other native
 plants such as the Beach Evening Primrose 

or the Yellow Sand Verbena. 

  Continue down the sidewalk  past the dunes restoration project and stand of  Monterey Cypress,

 past the public restroom, 

the “Ghost Trees” Monterey Cypress 
 that have died off, 

to the wooden board walk
 and the (10) Carmel Beach Overlook
You have arrived at the
beautiful white sand Carmel Beach. 
 To the left in the distance is Point Lobos, and 
to the right, Pebble Beach. 
Time to make the hike back to the bus stop.  At the parking lot follow the brick pathway across to the south side of Ocean Avenue. On the corner is a (11) rusty steel sculpture with no official name, but it was created in 2005 by local artist Michael Largent.  

Originally there was a similar sculpture here done by Mark Perlman, but over the years it became damaged and was replaced by the current piece. I have heard that there is a Geocache hidden somewhere on this sculpture.

The next five blocks back to the bus stop will be a bit steep, but there are still things to see.   At the end of the first block is Scenic Avenue. Worth a right turn, if you have an extra hour to walk along the beach via Scenic, if not stay on target and keep hiking up Ocean.

As you make your way back up Ocean Avenue there are two homes which always catch my eye.  They are not historical but do show off the unusual character that is Carmel-by-the-Sea.  No two homes will be alike here.

On the south east corner of Ocean
 and Scenic the house
behind the wrought iron gate, 

has a Spanish Eclectic style. 

One block further and you will pass “Ocean’s End” 
with the garden that never fails to amaze

 no matter what the season. 
Cross Carmelo Street and pass an old wooden door with chipped paint surrounded by ivy. There is nothing behind this door right now, the house was taken down to the ground.  But the door, stayed.

Cross Camino Real and you are back in the commercial district.  On the corner find (12) the historical Lamp Lighter Inn  a charming pet friendly Carmel Boutique Inn. 
The first structure of the Lamp Lighter Inn was built in 1924 on the north east corner of Camino Real, today this cottage is known as the Hansel and Gretel Cottage.  
Two more cottages were added by
 owner builder Maude Arndt in 1926. 

She selected a medieval English cottage style because of her intense interest in the character of Peter Pan, for whom the Inn was originally named.  
Cross Casanova to (13) Normandy Inn nestled in a beautiful garden setting. 
This historical hotel began life in the early 1920’s when architect Robert A. Stanton designed his office in French Norman style.
  In 1936 he designed the main part of the hotel to emulate a French country manor house and grounds. 
Stanton continued to add to the hotel over the years, adding the current office and entrance to the Normandy Inn in 1958.
From  here it is five blocks back to the tour bus stop at Carmel Plaza. For more information on the shops between Monte Verde and Mission Street see the Window Shopping Ocean Avenue Tour
Thank you for visiting! 

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Photos by L. A. Momboisse – http://www.carmelbytheseaca.blogspot.com

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Garzas Canyon – Focus on Wildflowers Hike – Let’s Go Outdoors

One of the best kept secrets for getting outdoors is the Monterey Peninsula Regional Park Districts Let’s Go Outdoors! hikes.  I say it is one of the best kept secrets because the usual cast of characters shows up for each hike.  Not that I don’t enjoy their company, we have developed quite a nice camaraderie, but I also think it is nice to share.  

The Garzas Canyon Focus on Flowers would be my fifth Let’s Go Outdoors activity since moving to the area in June of 2012.

To reach our starting point, coming from Carmel on Carmel Valley Road, pass the main entrance and Visitor Center for Garland Park, turn right onto Boronda Road.  This cuts through a lovely grove of eucalyptus trees  (shown in the picture at the top) and over a one lane bridge.  Turn left onto East Garzas Road.

There is ample parking on the outside of the trail.  The trail map above shows our hike outlined in yellow. And just as a side note, there are over 50 miles of trails in Garland Park and we are only walking 3 1/2 miles of them. 

Our hike was to have been led by Michael Mitchell, a MPRPD volunteer naturalist and co-author with Rod M. Yeager, MD of Wildflowers of Garland Ranch – a field Guide.   Apparently this was prerequisite reading, because many of my fellow hikers showed up with this text already in hand. Not to worry, I still have time to catch up for next time – I purchased my text on the way home at Griggs Nursery.  Anyway back to the hike…

At the last minute Mr. Mitchell was unable to join us so our hike was led by Gordon, with assists from
Paulette and Rick.  Paulette is very knowledgeable about the trails of Garland Park and quite good at flower identification.  Rick is very knowledgeable about birds (he can speak their language) local history, and  entertains us with his captivating stories of local flora and fauna.  He also can mimic a mountain lion which got all of our hearts pounding. 

Gordon, who is quite young at 88, amazed us all, not only with his ability to identify even the tiniest of wildflowers, but with his amazing stamina on a clearly strenuous (at least I thought it was) 3 1/2 mile hike with a number of steep climbs both up and down. 

Off we set on an early Saturday morning in late March. Before getting behind the fence to begin our hike, I had to ask the identity of a vine which I had spend the majority of the previous day removing from my garden.  It had appeared almost overnight and invaded our yard so thoroughly it was even reaching up and pulling the Acacia limbs down to the ground. 
The answer, an aggressive vine called Wild Cucumber, or Man-root because the roots of this plant can become almost as large as a man.  Looks like I will be pulling this out of our yard next year.

Next Gordon pointed out Poison Oak cautioning us not to touch this because 95% of the population is allergic to the oils on this plant (even when green).  Gordon, assuring us that he is one of the 5%, gently plucked a leaf from the plant and popped it into his mouth.  When asked what it tasted like, he deadpanned, “poison oak.” And with that we were off on our hike.
In the open field Gordon points out
the tiny white Popcorn Flower
(which I was never able to find),
purple Sky Lupine 
and Meconella the petals of which
alternate in color, cream and yellow.
We leave the open field and the habitat
quickly changes as we begin
our assent through the oaks. 
Gordon leads the way, naming plants
that prior to today, I am sorry to admit,
 I considered nothing more than weeds.
Take this patch for instance
after an hour on the trail I am actually
able to spot the
Padre Shooting Star
(upper left, mid right)
and Parry’s Larkspur (dark blue one
next to the purple one).  A flower that ends
in “spur” means that it has petals that
grow together and form a long
 “spur” (point) at the end.
  Gordon  navigates our hike by using the
carefully placed trail markers.

We continue on Garzas Canyon Trail
looking for the gate to Terrace Trail.
No horses on this trail, but dogs are allowed.
Terrace Trail crosses East Ridge and we stop (finally)
for a water break at the top of Redwood Canyon.
Rick, our bird docent, points out two
 Red-tailed Hawks
soaring effortlessly high above us engaging
in what apparently is a courtship dance.
 But no time to lollygag Gordon gets
 us back on our feet.
 We are on our way to find
 the fields of Indian Warrior.

Not to be confused with
Indian Paintbrush which we saw earlier.
 Our hike continues, at a rather rapid steep decent,
 into Redwood Canyon as
 we follow the Las Garzas Creek,
traversing back and forth over four
seasonally available wooden foot bridges.
We will follow the
tranquil Las Garzas Creek
 to the gate connecting to Garzas Canyon Trail,
and through the open field (where we began).
With my new found
ability to identify wildflowers I spy 
California Goldenfields, I think.
As a novice, I am open to correction.

I never did see the elusive Popcorn Flower
(thank goodness for Wikipedia).
I highly recommend Let’s Go Outdoors! Unless the popularity would mean that I am unable to join in the fun. Or maybe the popularity will lead to more hikes and more adventures. 

I have put together a pdf list of the wildflowers we saw on our hike and when possible have matched the name with a photo.  This exercise has encouraged me to take off on my own…stay tuned for there is so much of God’s Green Earth to discover.   Pax.
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Photos – L.A. Momboisse 2013

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Flanders Mansion, http://schemas.google.com/blogger/2008/kind#post, Mission Trail Nature Preserve, Walking Tour Carmel

Mission Trail Nature Preserve – Flanders Mansion Walk – Part II

Mission Trail Nature Preserve
Flanders Mansion Walk
Part Two
  
Before proceeding to the second half of our
tour here is a peak at some backgound.



Rancho Cañada de la Segunda

In the 1830’s under Mexican rule, a number of ranchos were created around Carmel Mission. One of those ranchos was Cañada de la Segunda granted to Lazaro Soto in 1839 (yellow highlight).
His land encompassed 4,367 acres northeast of the mission. In 1851, Soto sold the rancho to Andrew Randall for $500. Randall got himself a little bit behind with some of his creditors and was murdered in a San Francisco hotel in 1856. Mr. Randall’s land was subsequently aquired by his attorney, Fletcher M. Haight, in 1859. 
Mr. Haight needed money and took out a loan for $4,000 with Lloyd Tevis in 1862. Four years later, Mr. Tevis bought the land from Mr. Haight for (an additional) $11,950.
  
In 1869 Faxon Dean Atherton (namesake of Atherton California) purchased the land. At his death in 1877 title transfered to his wife, Dominga Doni de Atherton who in 1888 hired William Hatton to manage her holdings. By 1892 the enterprising Hatton had purchased the land from Dominga.  The picture above shows Hatton Fields in 1921, what would become the Flanders Mansion backyard. 
Dr. Daniel T. MacDougal
                                       

Dr. MacDougal began his career working at The New York Botanical Garden in 1899 he was recognized as the leading American authority on d

esert ecology and one of the first botanists to research chlorophyll. In 1906 he became the Director of Botanical Research at the Carnegie Institution in Washington, D.C.  By 1909, he had established a coastal botanical lab for the Carnegie Institue in Carmel, California and became known as an expert on the Monterey pine. The coastal laboratory was established at Junipero and Twelfth and remained in operation until the early 1940’s. During Dr. MacDougal’s tenure at the Carnegie Institute in Carmel, he purchased 80 acres of  land adjacent to Mr. Hatton’s property.

Paul and Grace Flanders
80 Acres from MacDougal

Paul and Grace Flanders who married in 1920 came to Carmel in 1922 to build a home and start a business in real estate development. They initially purchased 80 acres of land from Grace’s friend Dr. MacDougal of the Carnegie Institute, and proceeded to build their home on a portion of this property immediately adjacent to Hatton’s land.

The Flander’s were one of the first Carmelites to hire an outside professional architect to design their residence, which they named “Outlands,” due to its secluded location high on a raised hill overlooking the Carmel Mission, Point Lobos and the sea beyond.

Henry Higby Gutterson the supervising architect for the first subdivision in northern California, the St. Francis Woods development in San Francisco, was hired to build “Outlands.” Trained at the University of California, Berkeley and at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, Gutterson was the perfect designer for “Outlands” which Flanders planned on using as a model home for future residences of a Carmel subdivision he would develop. 

Paul Flanders President
Carmel Land Company
233 Acres from Hatton

In 1925, Paul Flanders, president of The Carmel Land Company purchased 233 acres of land from the Hatton Estate for $100,000.  On June 27th of the same year, the Pine Cone reported, “One of the largest and most important realty deals ever consummated in this vicinity took place last week when the probate court at Salinas confirmed the sale of 233 acres of land belonging to the Hatton estate. The purchasers of this splendid tract of land east of the Carmel city limits is a group of capitalists headed by Paul Flanders, who recently completed a beautiful residence in the vicinity of the property….The land involved in the deal is bounded at its northern point by Second Avenue in Carmel; on the west by the city limits; on the south by the county road that runs in front of the Carmel Mission and on the east by the same road…Henry H. Gutterson…has been retained to act as supervising architect in the laying out of the homesites.” 
Flanders Mansion
Outlands
25800 Hatton Road


Flanders Mansion lies at the end of a long driveway off Hatton road.  In an idyllic park-like setting it is entirely surrounded by the upper region of the Mission Trail Nature Peserve. 
No physical boundaries separate the Flanders Mansion property from Mission Trail Nature Preserve. The grounds of the mansion property are directly accessible from the Serra or Flanders Trail which exit the preserve at the fire access road just north of the back entrance to the home.  
Melanie Billig, President of Flanders Foundation joined us in the circle driveway of the mansion for the second portion of our tour.  She would enlighten us with more fascinating facts about the Flanders family and their impressive historical home “Outlands in the 80 Acres,” one of only two properties in Carmel-by-the-Sea listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
.

                   

Outlands in the 80 Acres

Outlands, or Flanders Mansion as it is commonly called, is a Tudor Revival English cottage of 8,000 square feet, 5,559 of which are developed livable space, seven bedrooms, five bathrooms, a basement and carriage house.

When Paul and Grace built Outlands, the location was exactly as its name suggests, outside, far from the main living area of town.  Not so by today’s standards, but in 1925 it would take the Carmel Fire Department (once notified which was another matter all together) quite some time to get their Luverne engine to Outlands.

The Flanders’ had previously been victims of a house fire. The home they rented in Pebble Beach while bulding Outlands was completely destroyed by a fire in February of 1925.  This may have been one of the reasons that Thermotite, manufactured by the Carmel Thermotite Company was used in  building this home.

According to “Ask Otey – He Knows,” Pine Cone January 1925, “Carmel Thermotite is fireproof, waterproof and practically everlasting.” 

In a form to the United States Department of the Interior submitted in 1989 for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places, Outlands was described as an “impressive example of the mature work of noted San Francisco architect Henry Higby Gutterson.  Gutterson employed a cavity-walled building sytstem of precast interlocking concrete blocks locally produced…The constuction of this cavity wall system is unique to its California location. The residence and its park-like setting retain to a remarkable extent their integrity as designed by architect Gutterson…The Paul Flanders Mansion, Outlands, is significant under National Register Eligibility Criteria C as the work of a prominent architect employing an innovative method of constuction…currently the only known example of Gutterson’s work in the region…”Outlands” retains to a remarkable degree both its context and integrity as originally constructed in 1924-25.”

This two story residence constructed of light grey Thermotite cement blocks rests solidly on a full concrete foundation with a partial basement. Melanie points out, “When you walk around the house you will see next to no cracks and it has gone through many earthquakes.  This thing is practically fireproof and seismic proof.  So when you read something that says the house if falling down, it isn’t.  It is in very good conditon for not having any TLC since the city bought it in 1972.”

The roof is steeply pitched with intersecting gables capped with Gladding McBean & Company’s “Berkeley” trough ceramic tiles fired in a russet color and laid irregularly. Flashing, still beautiful today, is copper and lead.

There are two principal entries.  One is located facing the circular driveway. 

The second, which is actually the front entrance (shown above), is located on the other side of the house facing what is now the edge of a Monterey Pine forest. “When the Flanders first bought this property the trees were about two feet tall,” Melanie explains, “they had an incredible view.” 

The Family
Paul and Grace were well loved in the Carmel community.  They entertained regularly, and were active in local arts and music.  They also enjoyed staging plays on their outdoor wooden “deck” overlooking the canyon, Mission, and sea beyond.

Paul and Grace Flanders had one child together, Barry, who died at 11 years of age in 1933 “after waging an heroic battle to recover from an illness that began five weeks earlier,” the Pine Cone reported March 31, 1933. His foot prints and initials are impressed on the top of the cement steps leading to the basement.  

 Barry’s room lies behind the three windows
covered in vines on the second floor. 

Paul Flanders was a retired Navy officer.  Melanie explained, “during the First World War he was in charge of submaries in the North Atlantic.  After World War II broke out he reenlisted in the Navy and was sent to oversee the possibility of Japanese submarines off the west coast.  He was away from the mansion a lot during those years,  back and forth to San Francisco and Washington DC.  In 1944 he was in DC and died of a heart attack.  He never came back to the mansion.  Grace lived here by herself, much of the time not very well, until her death in 1967.”

The City Buys Flanders
After the death of Grace Flanders in 1967, her beneficiaries developed a plan to subdivide the land and build 64 residential units. This plan was refused by the Carmel City Planning Commission. 

In 1972, the Flanders heirs agreed to sell the property, 14.9 acres to the City of Carmel for $275,000. This along with the 17.5 acre $125,000 Doolittle property the City had also purchased would become the Mission Trail Nature Preserve.

On May 20, 1973 more than 700 people toured the Flanders Mansion, as the City of Carmel held an open house in order to generate public interest and input on use for the mansion. 
Since 1973 it has been used as a residence for the city administrator, home of the Carmel Art Institute, and in October 1994, the Alliance on Aging hosted a major fundraisor in the mansion in the form of a designers showcase where interior design professionals from Monterey Country transformed the rooms of the mansion into a European country house.
What is inside the Mansion?
No one is allowed inside anymore so all one can do is peak through the windows and press their camera lens up against the glass.
Built at a cost of $17,500 in 1925,
the main living room features solid teak floors which still shine.
Multi paneled half circle carved walnut double doors
lead to the dining room with a tile floor and
rectangle wood inlay where the table would have been placed.
The banister leading to the second floor is teak.  
The bright yellow study can be viewed through the side window.
Around the fireplace, high on the walls, border and ceiling, a mural has been painted depicting slightly risque scenes from what appears to be life in Carmel and Monterey. 
 One of the five bathroom is visible off the study.

The pantry off the kitchen has a  pink and green flower pattern stenciled on the built-in cupboards, possibly a remnant left over from the Designers Showcase in 1994.

                    

Built-in’s were popular – here you can see the shoe holder on the back of the door to the closet and a peak of the chest of drawers inside the closet of one of the seven bedrooms.  

The Home and Garden section of The Sunday Herald,
October 9, 1994  featured some pictures from the
 Designers Showcase and a few before pictures.
The kitchen before
The kitchen after designer Diane Kremer updated the floors and added hand-waxed pine cabinets custom made by her own “Chelsea” design. In fact you will see a much better picture of her kitchen design on her home page.
The kitchen today, my pictures taken from outside.
The utility room before
The utility room after designer Gayle Gibson
painted the walls with a faux finish
and added a counter for the sink.
Today this room can only be viewed
(window on the far right)
from the outside
showing a different perspective.
  But the faux finish remains. 
The Heavenly View
The view from the grounds of the mansion has changed over the years, but what one sees when they walk through the juniper hedge….
 
…to a field overlooking where Paul Flanders
kept his horses and Mr. Hatton his cows…
 is still quite breathtaking,
though the trees have grown a bit,
The view heavenly. 
One of Carmel’s Best Kept Secrets
In the Footsteps of the Padres
What a gift the City of Carmel has been given with the purchase of this unspoiled Mission Trail Nature Preserve and National Historic Home Flanders Mansion.  It is my prayer that this can be preserved in its entirety, kept by the City of Carmel and used by and for the good of our community.  For  more information contact Flanders Foundation.

Mission Trail Nature Preserve
Flanders Mansion Walk – Part I

___
Credits
Map of Ranchos – Jack H. Moffett from Monterey County The Dramatic Story of Its Past by Augusta Fink
Hattons Fields 1921 – Land that Paul Flanders Purchased in 1925 –  Picture credit Pat Hathaway Collection
Map from article – City Buys Flanders Estate Pine Cone August 24, 1972
Pictures from Pine Cone October 9, 1994



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Mission Trail Nature Preserve – Flanders Mansion Walk – Part I

Mission Trail Nature Preserve
 Flanders Mansion Walk – Part I
One of Carmel’s Best Kept Secrets
 
On a late summer Saturday morning in September I joined a group at the entrance to Mission Trail Nature Preserve across from Carmel Mission for a “Nature and Historical Walk” led by Melanie Billig, President of the FlandersFoundation. Melanie has been graciously conducting these free walks during the spring and summer months for over 10 years.
Footsteps of the Padres
 The Governor took the road to Monterey, going through a dense forest of pine where were placed many great crosses, significant of Christ’s suffering.  But they had not gone far before a band of choristers appeared, all wearing newly washed robes, attended by many young Indians in the dress of acolytes.  They were closely followed by the padres marching in two wings.”  (Californian Trails, Intimate Guide to the Old Missions,
Towbridge Hall, page 230)

A year and a month after the founding of the Royal Presidio Chapel at Monterey in June 1771, Father Serra moved his church south six miles over a forested hill covered with oak, cypress, and pine to a marshy fertile area midway between the sea and the mouth of Carmel River.  For the next 50 years or so the Padres would tread a well-worn trail with their sandals, back and forth between Carmel Mission and the Royal Presidio Chapel in Monterey in order to conduct Mass, deliver or receive supplies.  

The area we would walk today in Mission Trail Nature Preserve is the only remaining part of the original trail traversed by the Padres that is not paved over by highway.  We were truly embarking on a “nature and historical walk.”

Mission Trail Nature Preserve

Mission Trail Nature Preserve was designated as a nature preserve, open space, and city park in 1972. There are five park entrances: Rio Road (where we now stood), 11th and Torres, Crespi Avenue and Mountain View Avenue, Martin Road, and 25800 Hatton Road, the location of Flanders Mansion and the Lester Rowntree Native Plant Garden.


This park encompasses 33 acres of mostly undeveloped land perfect for biking, dog walking, running, sitting, picnicking, bird watching, native plant discovering, or simple contemplation. 


It is an all around peaceful, unspoiled area with five trails that meander through a forested canyon filled with majestic oaks, pines, willows, and redwoods. The smell of eucalyptus and wood chips permeate the fresh air, and the sound of songbirds fill the space between the branches overhead. This park is a true gift to the residents and visitors of Carmel.

We proceed to follow the wide Junipero Serra Trail in the footsteps of the Padres.As we walk Melanie explains the history of Mission Trail Nature Reserve .

In 1971, the City of Carmel purchased 17.5 acres from the Doolittle Family for $125,000.  The following year the City of Carmel purchased 14.9 acres (including the manion) from the Flanders Estate for $275,000.  These two parcels would become Carmel’s largest park and open space, Mission Trail Nature Preserve.

The lower region of the park is characterized by a riparian habitat or marsh-like environment created in part by the drainage areas of Carmel that converge upon the park. 
This habitat will dictate which plants grow in this area.  In the lower park you will see dense areas of sycamores, willows and blackberries which provide cover for wildlife corridors. 
Many wild animals such as the mountain lion, bobcat, fox, deer, and opossum live hidden amongst the overgrowth of this riparian habitat.  They travel freely undisturbed between Carmel River, through the creeks and gullies of Mission Trail Nature Reserve on to Pebble Beach, Pacific Grove and beyond.  “You will rarely ever see them,” Melanie assures us, “but there are there.”
As we move along Serra Trail the lower habitat noticeably changes as redwoods planted by Mr. Doolittle tower above us cutting off the sunlight.  We have entered the upper region with an entirely different habitat filled with redwoods, pines and oaks.



Many of the trees and ground are overrun
with invasive Cape and English Ivy.
It may look beautiful but not really good for the trees.  
 

The idea of bringing in goats to clear out the overgrowth along the ground has been raised. Apparently they even eat the poison oak which is rampant off the trail. Leaves of three leave them be….. 

In a densely forested  area we come upon a stately mature oak tree with numerous limbs reaching out from its large split trunk.  There is no plaque, and nothing to call attention to the site, but Melanie explains that this tree was the location of the 13th Station of the Cross (Our Lord is taken down from the Cross).  

As the padres walked between the Presidio Chapel in Monterey and the Carmel Mission, they would pray the Way of the Cross a devotion depicting the scenes of Christ’s Passion. Towbridge Hall makes reference to this in his book, Californian Trails, Intimate Guide to the Old Mission when he writes, “…going through a dense forest of pine where placed many great crosses, significant of Christ’s suffering…” 
I make note to look further into this. Is it possible that the other stations still exist unceremoniously unadorned and forgotten somewhere along the road to the Presidio Chapel in Monterey?  The tune of the Stabat Mater fills my mind as I imagine the padres slowely and prayfully singing between stations…
At the cross her station keeping
Stood the mournful Mother weeping
Close to Jesus to the last…
We continue along the Serra trail spying houses camouflaged by the overgrowth.  When you see the red barn house on your left with white shutters adorned with heart cut outs, look right and you will find the path splits in two.  Take the higher road to Flanders Mansion.
We will meet you there…..
Mission Trail Nature Preserve
Flanders Mansion Walk Part Two


 

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